Foundation for Apps: Motion UI is the New Flat

Motion tells stories. Not Pixar-style, long and complicated, stories. More simple stories, like “hey, this content is different” or “yo, this item needs to be addressed” or “dude, that input was required.” These stories are simple, adding excitement and context to the person using the app.

[…] the flattening of the web has had its drawbacks. Minimizing most gradients, shadows and skeuomorphic elements has left a void in the design world for content differentiation. Motion helps us bring that back.
The loss of heavy gradients have removed some of the hierarchy of a page. Motion draws the user’s eye to help correct the lack of hierarchy. 
The lack of skeuomorphic elements can remove context for the user. Motion can help show the user where they are and how to get back. 
The removal of most shadows has taken away the context of 3-D space. The movement of one item on top of another item allows us to retain some of that context.

Foundation for Apps: Motion UI is the New Flat

Motion tells stories. Not Pixar-style, long and complicated, stories. More simple stories, like “hey, this content is different” or “yo, this item needs to be addressed” or “dude, that input was required.” These stories are simple, adding excitement and context to the person using the app.

[…] the flattening of the web has had its drawbacks. Minimizing most gradients, shadows and skeuomorphic elements has left a void in the design world for content differentiation. Motion helps us bring that back.

  • The loss of heavy gradients have removed some of the hierarchy of a page. Motion draws the user’s eye to help correct the lack of hierarchy.

  • The lack of skeuomorphic elements can remove context for the user. Motion can help show the user where they are and how to get back.

  • The removal of most shadows has taken away the context of 3-D space. The movement of one item on top of another item allows us to retain some of that context.

Jeff Atwood:

It was a bit of a surprise to get an email last night, addressed to both me and John MacFarlane, from John Gruber indicating that the name Standard Markdown was “infuriating”.

I’m sorry the name is so infuriating. I assure you that we did not choose the name to make you, or anyone else, angry.

The geeky drama continues…

UPDATE: From Standard Markdown, to Common Markdown to (finally?) CommonMark.

Generative eBook Covers

A New York Public Library Labs project to produce an alternative to generic placeholder images for public domain ebooks.

Book covers weren’t a big deal until the 20th century, but now they’re how people first interact with a book, so not having one really puts a book at a disadvantage. They are problematic, and not only in ebooks. It’s difficult to find high-quality, reusable covers of out-of-print or public domain books.

[github]

Generative eBook Covers

A New York Public Library Labs project to produce an alternative to generic placeholder images for public domain ebooks.

Book covers weren’t a big deal until the 20th century, but now they’re how people first interact with a book, so not having one really puts a book at a disadvantage. They are problematic, and not only in ebooks. It’s difficult to find high-quality, reusable covers of out-of-print or public domain books.

[github]

We propose a standard, unambiguous syntax specification for Markdown, along with a suite of comprehensive tests to validate Markdown implementations against this specification. We believe this is necessary, even essential, for the future of Markdown.

That’s what we call Standard Markdown.

For more context see Jeff Atwood’s Coding Horror blog post: Standard Flavored Markdown (and this post from 2012: The Future of Markdown).

See also: John Gruber’s response from his @markdown account on Twitter.

I spent a little time this evening tidying up the theme here. I had wanted to use my own design, but it wasn’t looking like I was going to get around to finishing it any time soon, so I just picked one of the clean free themes and tweaked it slightly. There’s a new avatar and header too. For ten minutes work, I’m quite happy with it.

I’ve also removed the #font-face and #webfont tags and replaced them with the more general purpose #fonts tag.

Enjoy!

I spent a little time this evening tidying up the theme here. I had wanted to use my own design, but it wasn’t looking like I was going to get around to finishing it any time soon, so I just picked one of the clean free themes and tweaked it slightly. There’s a new avatar and header too. For ten minutes work, I’m quite happy with it.

I’ve also removed the #font-face and #webfont tags and replaced them with the more general purpose #fonts tag.

Enjoy!

Beautiful Web Type

A showcase of the best typefaces from the Google web fonts directory.

There are over 600 typefaces in the Google web fonts directory. Many of them are awful. But there are also high-quality typefaces that deserve a closer look. Below are examples of these typefaces in action. Click the examples to get the typeface from the Google web fonts directory.

(I think I may have posted this one before, but I can’t tell because apparently the hyphenated ‘font-face’ tag I’ve been using doesn’t work on tumblr! I’ll sort it out later.)

Typespiration

Typespiration.com is the place where you can find inspirational web font combinations with ready-to-use CSS codes, color schemes and web-safe font families.

We believe that typography is a foundation of any great web design. With the current web technology and easily accessible resources we can use quality fonts in order to make the internet a more beautiful place.

Google font pairings

There are over 640 Google web fonts available for free. Problem is, pairing typefaces isn’t easy. And, many of the fonts in Google’s library don’t work well when applied to typical webpage (desktop) layouts. Part of the 25x52 initiative, this collaborative, ongoing project helps provide typographic inspiration for using Google’s web fonts for web applications.

Some lovely pairings, but the presentation is exceptional.

Jeffrey Zeldman: 20 years of Web Design and Community

Who is Jeffrey Zeldman? The “Miles Davis of web design”? “Godfather of the web”? Or simply “your friend on the Internet”? For people who make websites, Zeldman is all of these and more. He’s been a guiding voice in web design since the earliest days of the Internet, leading the charge in the fight for web standards. He’s an educator whose businesses—A List Apart, An Event Apart, and A Book Apart—are extensions of his basic instinct to share his best ideas. He’s also a community leader that other designers look to for inspiration. This film is an intimate portrait of a man who has helped shape the web but isn’t recognized by most of the people who use it everyday. Learn how he evolved his influential mailing list, how he convinced Netscape and Internet Explorer to support HTML and CSS, and what he’s doing to pass the torch to the next generation.